Blowing up climate change

It's hard to imagine a doomsday scenario with higher stakes, more exaggeration and greater calls for government intervention. It's just moral panic

Blowing up climate changeCanadian Thanksgiving was a blast for climate change propagandists. Monday’s turkey was in the oven as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that increasing carbon dioxide would destroy the Earth. Elsewhere, there was an explosion at Canada’s largest oil refinery. The next day, a pipeline exploded in British Columbia. It was described by…

Municipal governments should do less and spend less

The surest way to trim the bloated costs of municipal services is to privatize them. Competition drives costs down and quality up

Municipal governments should do less and spend lessMunicipal spending in British Columbia is rising far too fast. According to a report from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, the cost of running municipal governments – even after accounting for price inflation and population growth – rose by an average of 28 per cent across the province from 2006 to 2016. The business…

Tearing down statues, losing perspective on history’s heroes

John A. Macdonald and Louis Riel had serious flaws. So did Nellie McClung. But nothing is served by repudiating their good work

Tearing down statues, losing perspective on history’s heroesOne of Canada’s best known historic heroes has taken quite a shellacking lately. John A. Macdonald’s statue was removed from a place of prominence in Victoria by order of its city council, and there have been calls elsewhere for buildings that honour his memory to be renamed. Even the city that once gloried in the…

There’s never enough for Manitoba’s expensive public schools

It’s time the provincial government took over taxation decisions, merged school divisions and put a lid on spending

There’s never enough for Manitoba’s expensive public schoolsBy Alexandra Burnett and Rodney A. Clifton Frontier Centre for Public Policy On Oct. 24, Manitoba voters head to the polls to elect school trustees. But citizens are increasingly disaffected by school board politics and the turnout may be low. Many wonder if it’s worth voting at all. There are, however, good reasons to get…

The corrosion of social norms puts us all at risk

Insisting on righteous victory at any cost is the greasy slope to violence

The corrosion of social norms puts us all at riskOn the afternoon of May 22, 1856, Preston Brooks, a plantation owner and pro-slavery congressman from South Carolina, strode into the nearly deserted U.S. Senate chamber. There he accosted Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, who had been making a series of fiery abolitionist speeches. Brooks announced that Sumner had used insulting language toward his relative and…

Canada’s public sector is getting fatter, and that’s bad news

Instead of climbing out of debt, federal and provincial governments are spending more, to the detriment of the economy

Canada’s public sector is getting fatter, and that’s bad newsRecent employment data from Statistics Canada shows a troubling trend. In July, the ratio of private sector to public sector employees (excluding the self-employed) dipped to lows that – except for the period of massive ‘stimulus’ spending by the federal and provincial governments in 2009-10 – have not been seen since Canada’s fiscal crisis of…

Globalism trumped by Trump’s international vision

Many thought his staunch nationalism would kill the economy and spark international conflict. They were wrong

Globalism trumped by Trump’s international vision“In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country,” U.S. President Donald Trump recently told the United Nations. His overstatement inspired some chuckles, to which he quipped, “So true. … Didn’t expect that reaction, but that’s okay,” he smiled as the laughter grew, overtaken…

Canada’s identity forged by struggle that created shared values

Trudeau is wrong – it's not just diversity that makes us strong, it’s how our diverse parts find so much in common

Canada’s identity forged by struggle that created shared values“Be proud of your heritage – be passionate about your country,” was the motto of The Ukrainian Voice, a Winnipeg-based newspaper that recently ceased operations. First published in 1910, it was the leading advocate for Ukrainians in Canada. In this digital age, it couldn’t survive. Read by many in its day, it will be missed.…

The abysmal scorecard of socialist revolutions

Real communism has failed repeatedly to provide better living conditions. Why do countries like Venezuela persist?

The abysmal scorecard of socialist revolutionsNineteen years ago, ex-general Hugo Chavez came into power in Venezuela, vowing that a “Bolivarian revolution” based on communist principles would improve the lives of his people. Today, millions of Venezuelans are fleeing their homes looking for food, medicine or employment in neighbouring countries. Inflation is out of control. In a country with perhaps the…

Restricting Toronto mayoral debaters is wrong

Fair and equitable election coverage is necessary to maintain broadcast licences, not to mention Canadian democracy

Restricting Toronto mayoral debaters is wrongYou’ve heard of stage diving and photo bombing, but Faith Goldy has pulled a new one: stage storming. “Good morning, sorry to interrupt, I must have missed my invitation in the mail,” she said, having taken the stage to a Toronto mayoral election debate to which she was not invited. The candidate was armed with…